This page was last updated 29 June 2011 -- rak.

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The Baltic Sea

Most of our Volga-Deutsch ancestors in 1765 had to take ship from L├╝beck through the Baltic Sea to Kronstadt, the Russian naval base on an island just to the west of St. Petersburg. This trip was a minimum of 1,500 km, but, if there were storms, a sailing ship might easily have to cover better than 2,000 km while battling the storm or storms back and forth. As can be seen on the map, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Germany have coasts on the Baltic.

The Baltic is brackish water, much less salty than the North Sea into which it flows through three straits (the Great Belt, the Little Belt and the Sound) which together form a curve up and around Denmark. The eastern-most portion of the Baltic is called the Gulf of Finland which goes all the way to St. Petersburg on the east. This Gulf typically is frozen from sometime in January until sometime in late April, although as one gets closer to St. Petersburg ice ridges sometimes persist into May. Wave height on the Baltic is generally much less than out on the North Sea, however, the storms that often sweep the surface of the Baltic come up very suddenly and can be extemely violent.

Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland and Germany all have coasts on the Baltic Sea, which is brackish water much less salty than the North Sea into which it flows through three straits (the Great Belt, the Little Belt and the Sound) which together form a curve up and around Denmark. The eastern-most portion of the Baltic is called the Gulf of Finland which reaches Saint Petersburg on the east. This Gulf typically is frozen from sometime in January until sometime in late April, although as one gets closer to St. Petersburg ice ridges sometimes persist into May. Wave height on the Baltic is generally much lower than on the North Sea, however, the storms that often sweep the surface of the Baltic can be very sudden and violent.

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